Daily report – Guntis Valneris

Switch to daily report Maarten Kolsloot

December 17th

Today Roel Boomstra already from the opening attempted to lure Groenendijk into his well-analyzed opening scheme, in case Jan instead of what he chose in the game 6… 1217, had played 6… 2024, 7.29:20 15:24, 8.4338 1823, 9.4943 1015, 10.3127 1420, 11.2722 2429 and so on, which comprises rather forced variants, but having noticed how willingly Boomstra provokes his opponents to accept it, I presume he and his coach Rob Clerc had done much of a homework to prepare interesting deviations from the main known variants. Jan soundly avoided it all.

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December 16th

I noticed without effort that Roel Boomstra satisfied with his champion title accepted some principle position game today. Before he had secured his success he just kept Jan Groenendijk at a safe distance and played with a maximum safety cushion. During the whole match Roel didn’t make any attempt to shift away from positions, the evaluation of which might drift slowly into his opponent’s advantage, so to say, which could slip out of his control. Now he openly accepted fork-structure (or as Dutch say “hekstelling”).

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December 15th

Game No 10 started with obvious Roel Boomstra’s wish to put a formal end to the question on the winner, although in a humanly form it was ended after he crossed the minimum limit line of 3 victories. Although Boomstra is an accomplished positional player, still normaly he doesn’t choose for 2×2 on the 3rd move.

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December 13th

Roel Boomstra started game No 9 of the match with a satisfied feeling, since objectively (although not formally yet) everybody understands that he is a World Champion 2016. He has reached the 3 victories margin, and he just had to make 2 draughts out of 4 games, which should be enough. I felt in a game of today: the way he played. When in previous games he strictly followed the strategy of killing any Groenendijk’s attempt to engage in tough difficult strategies, then today on the contrary he freely accepted Jan’s Keller opening, although he only played safe moves.

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December 12th

In today’s game for the World Title Jan Groenendijk attempted to have a more difficult structure of the position, and in that he succeeded: the opponents had a position with corner piece on 15 for Jan. Still the inner essence of the game didn’t change: having secured a comfortable advantage in score Roel Boomstra went on with strategies “from the book”: the right moment occupying square 29, which is essential for white to create a reasonable counter game.

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December 10th

Finally on Saturday’s game Jan Groenendijk managed to skip all those classical structures and open positions. He played a Roozenburg attack, and Boomstra accepted the challenge. Jan Groenendijk understands this sort of positions quite well: it is what he likes – tactical game with a possibility to have immediate advantage when something happens not right on the tempo for his opponent. He played a very good game against me in Polish Open 2016 in Karpacz when I opted for a Roozenburg attack myself. To tell the truth I didn’t care much of the result that moment since my tournament situation was already hopelessly spoiled, but still it doesn’t diminish his success – he played very precise and he won that game.

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December 9th

Today in the match Roel Boomstra went on with his strategy as expected: technical game with time reserve. Jan Groenendijk tried a bit more active than yesterday. He avoided popular openings. It was no surprise to me that Boomstra provoked Gronendijk with his 2.3126 to close 2….1117, but then I am sure Roel had prepared something in his homework.

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December 8th

A player always feel ill at ease when he has to move to another place in the same match after a short break, and the place to which he moves is his native town. It is probably less the case with very technical players like Boomstra, Chizhov e.t.c., but it creates some discomfort to peculiar, not experienced and out of ordinary style player like Groenendijk for example.

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December 6th

When contemplating on the games No3 and No 4 of the match I come to conclusion that Roel Boomstra and his experienced coach grandmaster Rob Clerc have come to a general conclusion and guidelines: Roel plays what he knows well and within safety cushion in a relatively fast tempo without tactical deviations, in such a way that he always controls the game and has some safety limit for time.

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December 5th

I should characterize today’s game for the title as the one Roel Boomstra prefers. I think he would not contradict to play such games throughout the whole match.

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December 4th

It was interesting for me to follow the game No 2 for the World Title today. Both the oponents tried to play for win, although I presume that most of the old-style grandmasters would have chosen a quiet game on this occasion: on the yesterday’s winner part that would have meant that he marks clearly his advantage in victories, gets used to it, but on the player who is behind in victories that would mean a quiet rest day to concentrate on the next games, before the decisive battle.

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December 3th

In general Boomstra managed to have his own game today: opening without problems. It was clear he had analyzed and found some other continuations in preparationfor the match against Groenendijk in the opening of today. It was clearly marked with his moves: 09….0914 and 10….0409, instead of 09…1014 and, 10…0510, which has been played quite often in this opening. Besides he played fast, and without very serious consideration went on further with 16…2228.

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